Being A Good Cyber Citizen

 

Being A Good Cyber Citizen

In A Digital Community Knowledge Neighborhood

Introduction

With the emergence of Digital Communities and Knowledge Neighborhoods, it is important to understand what it means to be a good Cyber Citizen in the growing digital world.


Cyber Citizens grow and learn together through shared digital experiences

The Digital Community is not just about text, images and links. There is a culture and philosophy presumes that that learning is particularly effective when constructing something for others to experience. The Digital Community was born with collaboration in mind.

Encourage other citizens to experience the Digital Community together, not as a book that has been posted to the Web, but rather as members of an ongoing, active learning community.

This means that your job as a 'citizen' can change from being 'the source of knowledge' to being an influencer and role model of class culture, connecting with other citizens in a personal way that addresses their own learning needs, and moderating discussions and activities in a way that collectively leads the community forward.

Cyber Citizens need to be security-conscious

Citizens should be very careful about posting personal information to any web site, even your Digital Community site. Use common sense in this area. If you feel insecure, request assistance from other trusted citizens in your digital community.

Cyber Citizens should start small but think big

If you are new to the Digital Community or Knowledge Neighborhood andAnim woman with laptop have little or no experience with other course management systems, consider beginning with something easy and straight forward, like creating a web page resource to post information others may find interesting including lesson plans and links to helpful online resources. Do that until you are really comfortable. Then, as your needs dictate, move on to other modules: maybe a little forum to discuss current events in your discipline, for example.

The Digital Community and emerging knowledge neighborhoods are very robust and can overwhelm a novice. This “incremental” approach can help you avoid that. Don't worry, in a few weeks, you will be a fully involved Cyber Citizen!

As a Cyber Citizen remember to save, save, save

Please save your work every five to ten minutes. Develop this habit BEFORE your browser locks up in the middle of something big and you will never lose more than a few minutes of your wonderful, inspired contribution! Encourage your fellow citizens to do the same. They can become quite frustrated if they lose their work after thirty or forty minutes or more. It's best to teach every one early on to save every few minutes. Some people have even used a kitchen timer to help remind them to save their work.


Cyber Citizens should enter brief, helpful summaries for your resources

When other citizens click on links, it is helpful for them to see not only the title of the resource, but also some descriptive information about that resource. Many Citizens prefer to skip the summary, but it takes only a few moments to add one and doing so is an act of kindness toward fellow citizens and colleagues.

Encourage Cyber Citizens to think before they post

Many citizens have a very casual approach to posting to forums. This presumably comes from their many online interactions with their friends. This may be what you are looking for, but you will often want more thinking than that to occur when digital community citizens are communicating.

Just click for helpful advice. Encourage fellow citizens to make use of the built-in help system for suggestions about reading carefully, writing carefully, and asking good questions.

Cyber Citizens should provide feedback to the Digital Community

Citizens will quickly be the experts who will be able to tell you if you have set up your neighborhoods well, if they found it to be user friendly, and so on. Be sure to ask them for constructive feedback about what works and doesn't work. Their responses may sting a little, but can be very helpful. The choice, questionnaire and feedback modules are good for this purpose. The Digital Community also makes it very easy for you to act on that feedback and modify your neighborhoods as necessary on the fly.


Hide menu options on internal resources pop-up windows

When you create are source that is a text page, webpage, or internal file that opens in the browser, use the "Show settings" button to make the window pop-up options available. By setting these resources to open up as a secondary window, you can leave your main neighborhood page as a "launch platform". Using the additional options, you can create a nice streamlined window without all the normal browser menus. You can even size the window. It's a good idea to leave the allow scrolling and resizing windows available, as you may not always be able to predict how much screen space you need. Once the participant has viewed the window, they simply close it, taking them smoothly back to the neighborhood.

Do share with colleagues

Communicate often with colleagues at your own school, business, and anywhere else you discover potential citizens. Each person you meet will have different ideas to enhance your own creativity in your use of neighborhood resources.  When you find that something works well, always share it with others!

Teach follow citizens to modify subjects in forums

It is an act of kindness to helpfully modify subject lines in forums. This helpsanim kids learning participants follow the flow of the online conversation. It is a little hard to know what is going on when the subject About Bobo appears fifty times in a row. It is easier to follow when you have Bobo was a victim, I like Bobo, but..., and What this country needs is a ten thousand men like Bobo!

Don't let the expanding world overwhelm you

The Digital World is big and getting bigger! You can do all sorts of valuable and educational stuff in the Digital Community. So much stuff, that beginners can be overwhelmed by all there is to do and learn. But is it necessary to master all of Digital Community right away? Of course not.

Start with modest goals like posting plans and links to useful resources and go from there. Take your time and be patient. If you do have difficulty learning to do some of the more sophisticated things, turn to the fellow citizens in the community for assistance. In a few months, you will be comfortable and performing like a champ!

Don't dominate discussions

It is a sometimes necessary to guide citizens a bit in the forums. You give a nudge here and a nudge there. That's fine. But try to avoid posting too much yourself. Stimulating the discussion is one thing; dominating the discussion is another!

Don't assume that the coolness of the digital community will inspire or motivate citizens

Many citizens are amazed and impressed by what the digital community can do. Astonished, even. They simply assume that their fellow citizens will share their enthusiasm. Well, maybe... But remember that it is good citizenship (online or otherwise) that inspires others. Don't expect the community to do the job.

Don't be afraid to experiment

The Digital Community is designed to be played with. Set up a test course for yourself and experiment with the different modules - you can't break anything!

For development you can setup a local host on your own computer. It's easy and you won't have to wait for the screen to refresh from your Internet server.

Neighborhood Activities Overview

The neighborhood activity types (i.e. Discussion/Chat) and resources can help with a variety of human endeavors. The following table is a good starting point for citizen leaders wondering how to effectively use these activities in the community or to glean some examples of ways they have been used effectively by others.

Discussion/Chat

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

Forum

Chat

Collaboration/Group Work

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

Forum

Glossaries

Wiki

Workshop

Question/Answer

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

Choice

Hot Potato

Lessons

Questionnaire

Quiz

Web-based Activities - Webquests/Treasure Hunts

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

Weblinks

Webpages

Other

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

Assignments

Content Delivery/Storage

Activity Type

Learning Purpose

Recommended Age/Level

Description

Subject(s)

File Upload

Textpages

Weblinks

Webpages

 


Last modified: Thursday, 19 October 2017, 8:00 PM